red x-ray sign white walls

Story time…

Okay so you throw your back out doing the a very simple task, bending over to tie your shoe (gosh, I hate it when that happens). You are embarrassed (yep, me too) so you wait a few days before you seek help. Yes, the pain hurts, but HELLO, we are in the middle of a pandemic and your time, money, and health are very important resources (your time and money being more important than your health..right?). 

48 hours have passed and nothing has changed! Your pain continues to increase and now you can feel the pain creeping down the back of your leg and into your toes (can someone say s-c-i-a-t-i-c-a). The only comfortable position you can manage to get yourself in is the fetal position , and you truly have only slept 6 out of the past 48 hours. Ugh! Time to turn to the trusted Dr. Google for some kind insight on how to get relief from this awful pain. 

After a good hour on Google, you’ve decided you have 1 of 3 diagnoses: Sciatica, disc herniation, or something you can’t pronounce. Now you are in a worse state that you originally were, because the confusion has completely set in! The only clear advice that Dr. Google did give you, was that your local chiropractor would be a great place to start. 

 

Sooo….you type in “chiropractors in Eden Prairie, MN,” and you decide to book an appointment at the first office that has at least one 5-star rating, because duh! Google never lies right?

 

You get to the chiropractor’s office and are sooo excited to FINALLY get some pain relief, except it DOES NOT happen! Instead you get talked into purchasing a thousand x-rays, because the doctor refuses to adjust you without them. Then, you’re talked into putting down a thousand dollar down payment for a treatment plan, and the crazy thing about this entire appointment, you don’t even receive treatment! I mean is your back is now in worse shape than it was before you walked through the door. 

 

YUCK! 

 

So your trusted friend tells you about her wonderful chiropractor in Eden Prairie, MN. Since this is your best friend, you schedule an appointment, because your back is literally going to fall off if you don’t (okay not literally, but when you’re in that much pain, weird things happen). 

 

Oh, did I mention Altrui Chiropractic + Wellness was your best friend’s suggestion? 

Dr. Britt is able to quickly get you in for an appointment! She performs a  very thorough examination and explains your condition in terms that you understand. Best of all, you get are treated on the first visit (jaw drops). Excited, but equally confused, you ask Dr. Britt why the two chiropractic offices resulted in two very different experiences. Your main concern being why she did not take any x-rays, because hellllooo she is a spine doctor right?

 

She begins to explain to you the radiographic guidelines set by the American College of Radiology:  

  • No red flags or prior management = no radiographs warranted 
  • One or more of the following (low velocity trauma, osteoporosis, elderly, or chronic steroid use) = radiographs warranted 
  • Suspicion of cancer, infection, immunosuppressed = MRI 
  • Surgery or intervention candidate with persistent or progressive symptoms during or following 6 weeks of conservative management = MRI 
  • Low back pain or radiculopathy with history of prior lumbar surgery = MRI 
  • Low back pain or radiculopathy with suspected cauda equine or rapidly progressive neurologic deficit = MRI 

 

You wipe the sweat off your forehead, relieved, you didn’t need x-rays. Your condition does not fall into any of the categories that warrant radiographs or MRI. Helllloo money in your pocket…am I right? 

After 4 treatments at Altrui Chiropractic + Wellness, your back is feeling A LOT better! In all honestly you inform Dr. Britt that you are pain levels have gone from a 10/10 to a 0/10 and you will definitely recommend! 

 

 

The above guidelines are just for low back pain. There are different guidelines from the other parts of the spine and each area’s presenting symptoms. 

 

Resource: https://acsearch.acr.org/docs/69483/Narrative/